The Facts
  • Globally the market for the sexual exploitation of children stands at around $36B US, involving over 2 million children.
  • This number is growing at an estimated 20% per year.
  • These children routinely face sexual and physical violence.
  • The majority of these children live in East and South East Asia.
  • In Indonesia, there are 40,000 to 70,000 child victims of sexual exploitation throughout Indonesia.
  • In the Philippines 60,000 girls under 18 are exploited through prostitution nationwide.
  • In Thailand 40% of people involved in prostitution are below 18 years of age with 60,000 of those being children.
  • In Cambodia 313,000 children are trapped in the worst forms of exploitation such as drug trafficking and prostitution. 30-35 % of prostitution involve children and 80% of interviewed street children found to be involved in street-based sexual exploitation were male.
  • Before the recent Travel Ban, an average of 25 Australian Registered Child Sex Offender’s (RCSO) entered Bali per month and more than 250 Australian RCSO’s travelled to the Philippines in 2015.
  • The number of paedophiles travelling to these countries whom have not been caught or have not yet offended is not known.
  • The estimate that the market of trafficking South East Asian children for sexual exploitation stands at around $36B US, involving over 2 million children.

(Statistical sources: ECPAT and UNICEF)

 

Why does it happen? Exploitation of the world’s poorest children.

Close to half a billion people still live on $2 per day.[iii]

UNICEF reports in East and South-East Asia, more than 30 million children are unable to go to school, access basic health care, safe drinking water, a sanitary toilet or adequate nutrition.[iv] Comparatively Australia’s estimated population in 2012 was 22.7 million.[v]

 

Who exploits them? Organised Crime

Globalisation and unregulated economic growth have resulted in growing economic disparities. This, in conjunction with the continued expansion of the use of the Internet, increased migration, exponential growth of tourism, natural disasters, conflicts and violence, have all contributed to put more children at risk of sexual exploitation than was previously the case.[vii]

A recent report by a global network of groups against child sex slavery concludes is a “massive human rights violation that is currently going largely unnoticed around the world”[viii].

 

Our Response

Project Karma’s response in consultation with local communities, local law enforcement, governments and welfare agencies is the development of the “Sentinel Project Model”.

 

Help Us Help Them

Bringing justice and creating deterrents to future offenders.

Stand against these abhorrent crimes. Donate to be the difference.

 

 

(Statistical sources: ECPAT and UNICEF)


[i] The State of the World’s Children 2006: Excluded and Invisible, 2006, UNICEF, viewed 17 September 2015, <http://www.unicef.org/sowc06/press/release.php>.

[ii] 3235.0 – Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2011, Australian Bureau of Statistics, viewed 17 September 2015, < http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Products/3235.0~2011~Main+Features~New+South+Wales?OpenDocument#PARALINK4>.

[iii] The World Bank in The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in East and South-East Asia, 2014 ECPAT, viewed 16 September 2015, <http://www.ecpat.net/sites/default/files/Regional%20CSEC%20Overview_East%20and%20South-%20East%20Asia.pdf>.

[iv] Minujin in The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in East and South-East Asia, 2014 ECPAT, viewed 16 September 2015, <http://www.ecpat.net/sites/default/files/Regional%20CSEC%20Overview_East%20and%20South-%20East%20Asia.pdf>.

[v] 3235.0 – Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2012, Australian Bureau of Statistics, viewed 17 September 2015, < http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Products/3235.0~2012~Main+Features~Main+Features?OpenDocument#PARALINK4>.

[vi] Australians the worst child sex offenders in Thailand, 2009, News.com.au, viewed 17 September 2015, <http://www.news.com.au/world/australians-the-worst-child-sex-offenders-in-thailand/story-e6frfkyi-1225772485392>.

[vii] The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in East and South-East Asia,  2014, ECPAT, ECPAT, viewed 16 September 2015, <http://www.ecpat.net/sites/default/files/Regional%20CSEC%20Overview_East%20and%20South-%20East%20Asia.pdf>.

[viii] Australians the worst child sex offenders in Thailand, 2009, News.com.au, viewed 17 September 2015, <http://www.news.com.au/world/australians-the-worst-child-sex-offenders-in-thailand/story-e6frfkyi-1225772485392>.